Posts Tagged ‘tin glaze’

French faience patriotique plate, c.1790

Sunday, February 19th, 2017

To commemorate the end of the French Revolution, post-revolutionaries planted trees to celebrate their freedom. This well-used earthenware faience patriotique plate with tin glaze was made in Nevers, France, in the late 1700s. It is made of red clay and decorated with polychrome enamels to emulate Chinese porcelain.  The Liberty Tree depicted here reflects the patriotism of the French.

The underside of this plate reveals even more history, as over a dozen rusted iron staples still hold the damaged plate together after it was shattered more than 200 years ago. Plaster was used to fill the gaps that were left surrounding the tiny holes. To me, the unintentional overall pattern made by the staples on the underside are just as interesting as the design made by the artist on the front of the plate.

 

Inventive repairs in Prague

Sunday, May 15th, 2016

I just returned from a trip to Prague where I was bowled over by the seemingly endless amount of stunning Art Nouveau architecture, paintings, and decorative arts. Naturally, I was on the lookout for ceramics and glassware with inventive repairs, and was delighted to actually stumble upon a few good examples.

The most interesting ones were hiding in plain sight within the Prague Castle walls at the Lobkowicz Palace, which houses the Princely Collections of paintings, instruments, original musical scores, and decorative arts.

Two pieces of early rare Italian maiolica have what appears to be unexceptional 19th century tinker repairs. One of the jugs has a clunky and poorly painted replacement spout. I am surprised that the repairs found on these pieces were not executed with more artistry and finesse.

Rather than write the captions for my photos, I have copied directly from the English translations found on the glass display cases:

“Examples of a large service from Savona in North Italy, late 17th century.”

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“Examples from an extensive service of maiolica, from the Pavia region of Lombardy, painted in polychrome with scenes of figures and ruined buildings in mountainous coastal landscapes, all within borders of detailed moulded and painted acanthus leaf, flowers and grotesques some with wheat husk edging: Italian, late 17th century.”

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Happy New Year 2015!

Wednesday, December 31st, 2014

Wishing you peace in the New Year!

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Spanish earthenware bowl, c.1790

Tuesday, May 25th, 2010

Tin glaze earthenware bowl made in the town of Puente del Arzobispo, near Talavera de la Reina, an important ceramic center in the Castilla – La Mancha province of Spain. Puenta became one of the most important centers for ceramic production, after being founded in the early 1200’s.

Nine 2″ long rustic iron staples repair the cracks in this bowl.

Green, yellow and brown tin under glaze decorate the bowl’s surface with an abstract design.

Bowl measures 11-1/4″ diam, 5″ high.

Large white bowl from Seville, c.1820

Monday, April 12th, 2010

This heavy pottery bowl with a white tin glaze has a subtle blue line gracing the rim. I found it in a small, packed antique shop in Seville, Spain during a recent vacation

The hand woven wire web holds the many cracks in the ceramic together, enabling the bowl to be functional again. The web effect reminds me of a turtle shell pattern and is similar to the repair on a Tuscan pottery jug I found in Italy

A triangular formation of unglazed bubbles on the inside show where the bowl was suspended on stilts during the firing. The bowl measures 6″ high and is 15-1/4″ in diameter.

I display the bowl on my dining table, along with a Spanish tin glazed wine jug I purchased from the same shop

Early Delft vase, c.1680

Thursday, April 8th, 2010

I believe this Dutch or German Delft vase to be the earliest piece in my collection. It is made of tin-glazed earthenware and decorated with a blue & white Chinese motif, as were most European ceramic pieces dating from the 17th and 18th centuries

Time has not been kind to this very heavy vase, which stands 10-1/2″ tall, but it must have been cherished by its owners over the past 330 years or so. It has survived the loss of its original base and bears the battle scars of large chips and cracks, restored many years after it was first made

It now stands on a wobbly, cracked wooden base, painted blue and white to match the body of the vase. Unfortunately, the painted surface has become unstable, flaking each time the vase is touched

Spanish tin glazed jug, c.1800

Tuesday, April 6th, 2010

I found this large tin glazed earthenware olive oil jug at a tiny gem of an antique shop in Seville, Spain. While looking for a restaurant open for dinner before 10PM, we stumbled upon the shop, tucked away on a small side street. As the lovely Spanish shop owner spoke very little English and I barely speak any Spanish, we had a challenging but fun time communicating and bargaining.

I love the simple shape of this jug, which stands nearly 12″ tall…

as well as the slightly askew applied handle and beautiful green color.

The entire bottom of the jug is held together with large metal rivets.

French Delft ewer, c.1690

Thursday, March 11th, 2010

A French red body tin glazed earthenware ewer in traditional blue & white Delft decoration. Made for export, most likely for the Persian market.

I found this unusual piece in an antique shop in Cold Spring Harbor, NY while working on the film Eat Pray Love as a set decorator.

Elaborate metal mounts with dangling glass “jewels” replace the original ceramic spout, handle and cover.

The metal twisted rope style handle replaces the original long-gone handle, which would have been much simpler in form. It attaches at the bottom of the ewer to the stub of the broken handle.

Decorative multi-color glass beads are wired on to the metal cover and spout.

The ewer has a delicate baluster form and measures 6-1/2” high.

This similarly shaped ewer still sports its original handle and spout, although to me it looks a bit naked without the fanciful adornments found on my ewer.

Photo courtesy of eBay