Posts Tagged ‘stoneware’

Sprigged stoneware jug, c.1840

Sunday, June 26th, 2016

This small sprigged baluster form stoneware jug is decorated with applied vines of grapes around the middle and impressed leaves along the rim. A wash of brown glaze covers the top half of the jug. It was made in England in the mid 1800s, most likely in Bristol or Chesterfield, and measures 3.25 inches high and 4.5 inches from handle to spout.

Sometime in the late 1800s to early 1900s, the handle became detached. Luckily, the owner found a proficient tinsmith who fashioned a sturdy metal replacement with crimped detailing and horizontal support straps.

This jug with similar form and glaze shows what the original handle on mine might have looked like.

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Photo courtesy of Flickr

 

Mortlake stoneware jug , c.1800

Saturday, April 18th, 2015

This heavy salt glazed stoneware ale jug was made in Mortlake, London, in the late 1700s to early 1800s. It has an attenuated baluster shape with applied sprigged decoration including a panel of “The Two Boors”, horses and hounds, classical figures, trees and a windmill on a mound. It stands 8″ high and has a rilled neck and a narrow base, much of which has been chipped away.

It’s apparent that the original handle is long gone but luckily for me, a tinsmith in the 1800s fashioned a wonderful metal replacement handle. It has crimped edges for extra support and a finger rest for comfort when tightly gripped. I imagine the original owner and a chum were inspired by the front panel depicting “The Two Boors”, drank too much ale and dropped the jug. But if it weren’t for our ancestors who drank to excess, my collection of ale jugs with inventive repairs would be minimal to nonexistent.

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This jug of similar form has its original handle intact.

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Photo courtesy of Nest Egg Antiques

German Annaberg jug, c.1680

Saturday, October 18th, 2014

This early black-brown salt glazed stoneware pewter-mounted Birnkrug “pear jug” was made in Annaberg, Germany in the second half of the 17th century. It has incised scaled body decoration of stylized relief palmettes and leaf ornamentation divided by applied molded borders, the front with a figure of Jesus. It is embellished in polychrome enamels and gilding, which have remained surprisingly vibrant after over 330 years. The hinged pewter lid is connected to a ball thumb piece and inset with what appears to be a coin with a crucifixion scene.

As rare as this 10″  high jug is, it is even more special to me by possessing a pewter replacement handle, added by an 18th century tinker, most likely in Germany, after the original handle broke off. The delicate handle, with an intricate stippled wave design and border, is supported by a mounted pewter base ring and lid collar. I first saw this pricy jug at an antiques shop over one year ago and passed on it. But I recently stopped by the shop again and was delighted to find that no one else had snatched it up. After a brief bargaining session with the friendly dealer, I was finally was able to purchase this gem and add it to my collection.

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This jug of similar form and decoration still has its original handle.

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Photo courtesy of Bonhams

Georgian Castleford teapot, c.1810

Sunday, July 20th, 2014

This handsome Castleford-style teapot with neoclassical design was made in England in the early 1800s. It is made of fine-grained unglazed black basalt stoneware with a hinged lid set in a scalloped rim and fastened with a metal pin. It measures 5-1/2″ tall and 8-3/4″ from handle to spout. Two different classical tableaux in detailed relief are on each paneled side, with acanthus leaves at the top and the bottom.

When this teapot was dropped over 150 years ago, the spout broke in two places and the knob came undone. Typically, fragile lids on teapots with this design snap off so I am surprised that this lid remains intact. A 19th century tinker repaired all of the broken bits by attaching two metal sleeves around the breaks in the spout and riveted on a new metal replacement knob. The metal repairs were originally painted black to blend in with the black basalt color of the pot, but time and age have peeled away the paint, leaving a pleasing patina to the metal. There is a later putty repair to a crack on the underside which is useless now, but I imagine it served its purpose at the time it was applied.

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This example with nearly the same form, shows what the original spout and knob would have looked like on my teapot.

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Photo courtesy of D. G. Barsby Antiques

German Maskau jug, c.1740

Sunday, July 14th, 2013

This rustic brown stoneware jug with ovoid body was made in the Muskau region of Germany in the mid 1700s. It is decorated with incised stylized foliate against a crosshatched ground above vertical fluting and black glaze highlights. Remains of the original stoneware handle can be seen beneath the metal replacement. It is attached at the top to the remains of the pewter lid hinge and at the bottom using a horizontal metal band, blending in nicely and appearing to be a part of the original design. An additional horizontal band around the neck helps to stabilize the multiple cracks beneath. The original pewter mounted lid went missing long ago, which is not uncommon for a much-used flagon of this age. It measures nearly 9-1/2″ high.

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This fine example has its original handle intact and shows what mine would have looked like before it broke and was brought to the local tinker for repair.

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Photo courtesy of Martyn Edgell

The New York Ceramics Fair, 2012

Saturday, January 21st, 2012

On Wednesday of this past week I bundled up and made my annual journey northeast to The New York Ceramics Fair, located on the Upper East Side of Manhattan. Each year at this time I look forward to attending the event and have been doing so since 2004. It’s always a pleasure to see the dealers and to drool over their fabulous merchandise, hoping that I will see some wonderful examples of inventive repair.

Leon-Paul van Geenen brought this amazing 17th century Dutch or German roemer with jaw dropping repairs.

Two brass palette-shaped plates, convex on the outside and concave on the inside, have been riveted together to conceal a large hole in the center.

The inside of the goblet shows the hammered ends of the rivets holding the plates in place.

The stem also has a unique repair; a plate with initials and a date of 1718, most likely the date of the repair and the initials of the restorer.

This is an example of a roemer without repairs, and in my mind, the less interesting of the two!

Another example of inventive repair brought by Mr. van Geenen is this small stoneware jug made in Sieburg, Germany.

The jug has three molded figural medallions, the center one with a man’s face and a date of 1595.

But what interests me the most is a lead plug with an incised cross, sealing a small hole on the side of the jug. I have not seen this type of simple yet effective repair before and will now be on the lookout to find other examples.

Hunting scene tavern jug, c.1860

Monday, August 22nd, 2011

English salt-glaze stoneware cream jug with sprigged decoration entitled “The Kill”, made in the mid-1800’s, possibly in Derbyshire. The glass-like coating is achieved by adding salt to the kiln and firing at approx 1660 degrees F (780 degrees C). As the sodium chloride vaporizes and bonds with the silica in the clay, it creates a silicate glass “salt-glaze” finish.

Jug stands 4-1/2″ high and is 5″ wide.

Over 150 years ago, a tinsmith repaired the broken handle with a metal replacement, complete with thumb rest and straps.

A screw and metal strap, part of the molded sprigged decoration, “held” the original ceramic handle in place, and now an actual metal handle has replaced the broken handle.

This jug, similar in form and decoration, still has its original handle intact.

Photo courtesy of Flickr

Stoneware beer pitcher, c.1835

Saturday, April 9th, 2011

An impressive three quart baluster shaped stoneware pottery beer pitcher made in Haddonfield, NJ by Carl Wingender between 1820 and 1850. Jug has a hinged pewter lid and is decorated with an incised floral motif filled in with cobalt blue slip.

Pitcher measures 12-3/4″ tall.

A hefty metal replacement handle was added after the original stoneware handle broke off, no doubt due to the extreme weight of the jug and its contents. Or due to the clumsiness of an inebriated drinker.

The original “make-do” repair incorporated a thick tin band that was attached at the bottom of the replacement handle and encircled the jug, covering up much of the front decoration. It may have rusted and fallen off, as I have seen on other pieces with similar repairs.

The top of the pewter lid is engraved with the original owner’s initials.

Wonderfully detailed sketch showing an almost identical jug with its original handle.

Drawing from the book “Early American Folk Pottery” by Harold F. Guilland, 1971.

Classical jasperware teapot, c.1840

Friday, March 25th, 2011

The body of this small unglazed stoneware teapot is made of pale blue jasper (comprised of 59% barium sulphate, 29% clay, 10% flint, 2% barium carbonate) and is decorated with an applied white relief jasper classical scene decoration. It was made in Staffordshire, England around 1830-1850.

Teapot stands 4″ tall. The lid has a skep shaped knob.

The replaced metal handle is fastened to the body using metal bands that wrap around the top collar and bottom of the teapot. Although this method of repair is more unsightly than two small bolts holding a new handle to the body, it is less likely to leak.

Bottom is marked only with the number “43” incised in an applied relief seal. The remains of an earlier putty repair are also evident.

English stoneware harvest jug, c.1850

Wednesday, November 24th, 2010

A two-tone unsigned salt-glazed stoneware jug from England, possibly by Doulton Lambeth. The sprigged hunting scene & cupids decoration has a glass-like coating, achieved by adding salt to the kiln and firing at approx 1660 degrees F (780 degrees C). As the sodium chloride vaporizes and bonds with the silica in the clay, it creates a silicate glass “salt-glaze” finish

Jug stands 5-1/2″ tall and is 5-1/2″ wide

A detail of the applied sprig decoration to the front of the jug

Judging by the many chips along the rim, I am not surprised this jug lost its handle as well, as it was not doubt used daily for many years in an English pub

The tin handle with thumb grip and horizontal band replaces the original handle, created by a tinsmith in the middle to late 1800’s. Tin replacement handles are one of the most common types of inventive repairs and I have dozens of examples in my collection

This jug still has its original handle and gives an idea of what the handle on my mended piece would have originally looked like

Photo courtesy of WorthPoint