Posts Tagged ‘pearlware’

Georgian creamware teapot, c.1790

Saturday, April 1st, 2017

I love finding pieces with multiple repairs and this lovely soft paste pottery creamware teapot with pearlware glaze fits the bill nicely. It was made in Staffordshire or Leeds, England, in the late 1700s and is hand painted with spritely polychrome floral decoration on both sides. It measures 5 inches high and is marked with what appears to be A+A in red on the underside of the pot and lid.

But of course the reason it ended up in my collection is the three inventive repairs, which include a slightly exaggerated bronze handle covered in rattan, a brass collar concealing a chipped spout, and a cracked lid repaired with brown paper tape. I believe each repair was done years apart so one can only assume that the previous owners of this teapot were a clumsy lot.

This teapot still has its original handle and spout and shows what mine may have looked like before it was repaired.

Photo courtesy of Skinner

The Slaughter Feast jug, c.1795

Saturday, August 13th, 2016

This pearlware pottery Prattware jug was most likely made in Staffordshire, England, between 1790 and 1800. It has molded polychrome relief decoration, with The Slaughter Feast, attributed to Ralph Wood, on one side of the jug and An Offering of Peace, designed by Lady Templetown and modeled by William Hackwood, on the other side. It measures 6.25 inches high.

It looks as though over 200 years ago someone took the image of The Slaughter Feast a bit too literally and broke off the handle. Luckily for the owner, a tinsmith was able to create a simple metal replacement handle so that the jug was able to function again. But as luck would have it, a brawl began after the first repair was completed, resulting in a damaged spout. Although the pressure is intense, I promise that as long as I am the keeper of this jug I will do my best to insure no further damage befalls it.

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This intact jug shows what the original handle on mine would have looked like before it took a tumble.

pratt ware jug

Photo taken from the book Pratt Ware 1780-1840 by John and Griselda Lewis.

Nelson commemorative jug, c.1805

Saturday, September 28th, 2013

This colorful “Dutch” shape jug with transfer decoration and overglaze washes was made in Staffordshire, England to commemorate Vice Admiral Horatio Nelson, who died in battle at the Battle of Trafalgar in 1805. After he was killed by a French sniper, Nelson’s body was preserved in brandy while being transported by ship back to England for burial. Nelson become one of Britain’s greatest war heroes and is memorialized by many London monuments, including Nelson’s Column in Trafalgar Square.

In 1797 during the unsuccessful Battle of Santa Cruz de Tenerife, Nelson tragically lost an arm. The ship’s surgeon, James Farquhar, wrote in his journal: “Compound fracture of the right arm by a musket ball passing thro a little above the elbow; an artery divided; the arm was immediately amputated.” Legend has it that within 30 minutes of treatment, Nelson was back in battle commanding his troops.

It seems this jug, too, has been to battle, as sometime in the mid-1800s it’s original handle snapped off and was replaced by a metal one. The itinerant tinsmith did a fine job fashioning a simple yet sturdy loop handle with thumb rest and small flourish at the bottom, which might have been his signature embellishment. It’s a shame that Lord Nelson couldn’t find a replacement for his own missing arm, as seen by the empty draped sleeve in his famous portrait by Lemuel Francis Abbott.

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This jug, also commemorating the death of Admiral Nelson and with similar form, shows what the handle on my jug might have looked like before it was wounded in battle.

nelson jug

Photo courtesy of Toovey’s

Chinoiserie print ale mug, c.1790

Sunday, March 17th, 2013

This substantial ale mug was manufactured at the turn of the 18th century, possibly by Caughley, in Shropshire, England. It stands 5-1/2″ tall and is made of soft-paste porcelain with a pearlware glaze, and decorated with a bold cobalt blue Chinoiserie fantasy transfer print. It was purchased in London by my father and given to me as my 40th birthday present. Seeing it reminds me of how proud he was when he found pieces to add to my numerous collections. Although it has just 2 small brass staples by the handle and not an over abundance of obvious repairs, as more typically seen in these pages, I am still very happy to own it.

White ironstone water jug, c.1870

Saturday, October 27th, 2012

Not much is known about this large white ironstone water jug with impressed basket weave design and pearlware glaze. It was found at a bottle dig site in Harper’s Ferry, NY, and remarkably, the tin handle, buried in the ground for dozens of years, remained mostly intact. The neck and spout of the jug were not so lucky, as much has broken off, revealing an asymmetrical jagged edge. This scrappy jug was made in England in the mid to late 19th century, and measures 9-1/4″ hight to top of handle and is 7-1/2″ at its widest point.

This intact jug shows what the original handle and top edge of my jug would have looked like before the tumble.

Photo courtesy of One Kings Lane

Miniature pearlware ladle, c.1840

Saturday, August 25th, 2012

English miniature soft paste pottery pearlware ladle from set of child’s dishes, measuring 3-3/4″ long and dating from the early to middle 1800s. The two broken halves are bound together by a criss cross of thin brass wire woven through 2 tiny holes on either side of the break. Small dabs of cement in each hole help secure the repair.

I pity the small child who briefly lost the use of their ladle during what might have been a fantasy feast. And I applaud the person who came to the rescue, making the two broken pieces whole again, thus allowing the imaginary dinner party to continue!

 

Georgian pearlware teapot, c.1820

Saturday, April 21st, 2012

English pearlware pottery cottage-form teapot with puce transfer decoration of a girl sitting on a richly upholstered chair in a pastoral setting and holding a bird. Teapot is unmarked but was most likely made in Staffordshire during the Georgian era, in the first quarter of the nineteenth century.

Both sides of the teapot have the same decoration.

Teapot measures 10-3/4″ from handle to spout and is 5-1/2″ high.

A replacement handle made of solid pewter incorporates the top remaining handle fragment and has a nice heart-shaped plate at the bottom.

The lid also has an inventive repair, with a copper bolt reattaching the broken knob.

Child’s pearlware teapot, c.1790

Wednesday, February 8th, 2012

Miniature pearlware pottery child’s teapot made in England in the late 1700’s. With cobalt blue underglazed “Chinese House” decoration, derived from English Chinoiserie pieces rather than actual Chinese ornamentation.

I am surprised I have not come across more examples of miniatures and children’s items with inventive repairs, as I would imagine that slippery little fingers would surely have caused many a fragile toy to break. I just hope the children who damaged these items were not punished too severely.

Teapot measures 2-1/2″ high and was most likely made in Staffordshire between the years 1780 and 1800.

The simple loop handle which broke off over one hundred years ago, was replaced with a sturdy tin replacement with crimped edges and an upper support band by an itinerant tinsmith, look at the wild thing review. The top portion of the original handle was not ground down and still remains.

Provenance sticker: Roger Bacon Collection, Skinner auction Sept. 23-24, 1982.

This similarly shaped and decorated child’s teapot of the same size still has its original handle and an intact lid.

Photo courtesy of De Porcelijne Lampetkan

Floral pearlware cream jug, c.1800

Monday, January 2nd, 2012

Lightweight, soft paste pottery cream jug with fluted body, made in England, possibly by Lowestoft. Boldly decorated with hand painted pink flowers and diaper decoration on the inner rim.

Jug was made at the turn of the 19th century and measures 2-1/2″ tall by 4-1/2″ long.

Metal handle with thumb rest and finger grip replaces the original handle and was most likely made by an itinerant tinsmith.

One of 2 rivets which holds the tin handle firmly in place can be seen on the inside of the jug.

This nearly identical cream jug still has its original loop handle.

Photo courtesy of eBay

“Farmers Arms” harvest jug, c.1805

Saturday, October 15th, 2011

An English pearlware “Dutch” shape jug made in Staffordshire, England in the early 1800’s. It is decorated on both sides with a black transfer decoration with red & yellow overglaze washes and silver lustre bands at the top and bottom. Although it has been beat up over the past 200+ years, is riddled with numerous chips and cracks and lost its original handle along the way, I am glad to have plucked it from near oblivion.

The banner proclaims “INDUSTRY PRODUCETH WEALTH” along with images including a bee hive, shafts of wheat and farm tools.

Jug measures 4-3/4″ tall.

Below a banner which reads “TRUST IN GOD” is the verse:

“SUCCESS TO THE FLEECE

THE PLOUGH AND THE PAIL

MAY TAXES GROW LESS

AND THE TENANT NE’ER FAIL”

The replacement metal handle with thumb rest has been painted silver to blend in and appear more pleasing.

A metal bolt, securing the metal handle to the body of the jug, can be seen from the inside of the fragile jug.

This example has the same form and silver lustre decoration as my jug and shows what the original handle might have looked like.

Photo courtesy of Powerhouse Museum