Posts Tagged ‘English’

Worcester teapot with thimble spout, c.1770

Sunday, April 14th, 2013

A fine example of a globular form porcelain teapot made in England by Worcester in the 3rd quarter of the 18th century, it is hand painted with polychrome enamels in the Conjurer pattern, with unusual cobalt blue underglaze rim decoration.

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Teapot measures  7-1/2″ wide from handle to spout and stands 4-1/2″ high minus its original flower finial lid. Metal replacement spouts on teapots are one of the most common inventive repairs I encounter and I have dozens of examples ranging from crudely cut tin, to ornately chased silver.

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I purchased this one a few months ago under the guise of the spout’s having a typical metal replacement, as I was interested in owning my first Worcester teapot. But as I unpacked, upon closer inspection I discovered that the replacement spout was actually a repurposed 19th century sterling silver thimble!

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What an ingenious solution to saving two precious, much used household objects. It seems that the thimble, which must have been jabbed by a needle one too many times, and finally bearing a hole in the end, was crudely cut at an angle and cemented to the damaged end of the ceramic spout. With such a simple DIY solution, I am surprised I haven’t seen more repairs done in this manner. I can only imagine that had Hints from Heloise appeared in 19th century newspapers, there would be many more examples like this in existence today.

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Another Worcester example with similar form and decoration shows what the lid and end of the spout would have looked like on my teapot.

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Photo courtesy of Trocadero

Chinoiserie print ale mug, c.1790

Sunday, March 17th, 2013

This substantial ale mug was manufactured at the turn of the 18th century, possibly by Caughley, in Shropshire, England. It stands 5-1/2″ tall and is made of soft-paste porcelain with a pearlware glaze, and decorated with a bold cobalt blue Chinoiserie fantasy transfer print. It was purchased in London by my father and given to me as my 40th birthday present. Seeing it reminds me of how proud he was when he found pieces to add to my numerous collections. Although it has just 2 small brass staples by the handle and not an over abundance of obvious repairs, as more typically seen in these pages, I am still very happy to own it.

Derby porcelain ointment box, c.1905

Saturday, January 19th, 2013

This tiny porcelain ointment box was made in England by Royal Crown Derby in the early 1900s. Standing a mere 1″ tall and with a diameter of 1-3/4″, it is one of the smallest antiques with inventive repairs I own. It is nicely hand decorated in the Imari pattern with classic cobalt blue, red and gilt enamels. The “V” mark on the bottom of both the lid and base dates this wee box to 1905. The underside of the lid reveals three metal staples, graduating in size from 1/4″ to 3/8″ long, which hold the two broken halves tightly together.

 

Small creamware jug, c.1810

Sunday, December 16th, 2012

This small, lightweight ribbed creamware jug with gadrooned rim was made in England at the turn of the 19th century. It measures 3-1/4″ tall and has a replaced handle made of aluminum, a material I rarely encounter on repaired items. Two small rivets hold the handle to the body, which can be seen from the inside of the jug. I am glad that some of the cream colored enamel, painted in the same color as the jug and intended to mask the early repair have chipped away, exposing portions of the raw metal underneath.

Chinese-English “monster mug”, c.1780

Saturday, November 24th, 2012

This is the story of a forced marriage between an 18th century Chinese porcelain mug and a 19th century English pottery jug, joined together by a mad tinker to live out the rest of their lives as one. The Qianlong period (1736-1795) mug with cobalt blue underglaze design stands 5-1/8″ high. The original handle, most likely in the form of a dragon, broke off sometime in the early 1800s. I imagine a clever repairer (or Dr. Frankenstein?) found a damaged English stoneware pottery jug, skillfully removed the intact snake-shaped handle and, using two metal rivets, reattached it to the body of a Chinese tankard…creating a hybrid Anglo-Asian monster mug!

This is what the original dragon handle on my Chinese mug would have looked like before it broke off. Photo courtesy of Ruby Lane

And this Mason’s Ironstone “Hydra” jug, made in Staffordshire, c.1830, shows the serpent handle intact. Photo courtesy of Selling Antiques

Miniature Davenport watering can, c.1860

Saturday, November 10th, 2012

English porcelain miniature watering can made by Davenport in the mid-1800s. Finely painted with multicolor floral and scrollwork design with gilt accents. Measures 2-3/4″ high to tip of moth form lid finial and is 3-1/2″ wide from end to end. Stamped in red with DAVENPORT in a banner with an anchor, dating it from 1850 to 1870. Three brass staples on the handle, with the aid of some sloppily applied glue, hold the three broken pieces back together again.

White ironstone water jug, c.1870

Saturday, October 27th, 2012

Not much is known about this large white ironstone water jug with impressed basket weave design and pearlware glaze. It was found at a bottle dig site in Harper’s Ferry, NY, and remarkably, the tin handle, buried in the ground for dozens of years, remained mostly intact. The neck and spout of the jug were not so lucky, as much has broken off, revealing an asymmetrical jagged edge. This scrappy jug was made in England in the mid to late 19th century, and measures 9-1/4″ hight to top of handle and is 7-1/2″ at its widest point.

This intact jug shows what the original handle and top edge of my jug would have looked like before the tumble.

Photo courtesy of One Kings Lane

Small copper lustre gravelware jug, c.1840

Saturday, September 22nd, 2012

A tiny copper lustre jug, made in England in the mid-19th century, has an applied decorative gravel band at the bottom. It measures just 2-3/4″ tall.

In America, lustreware became popular in mid-19th century. During the Victorian period, a certain dinner party fad was to place lustreware pieces on a mirrored platform as a table centerpiece and watch the glow of gaslight sparkle and shimmer.

Over 100 years ago, a tinsmith made a sturdy replacement handle with two support straps after the original handle broke off. I particularly like the elegant loop the handle makes at the peak, avoiding the remaining broken fragment of the original.

This jug, with similar form and decoration, shows what the simple handle on my perfectly imperfect jug would have looked like before its disfiguring accident.

Photo courtesy of best military watch

 

Miniature pearlware ladle, c.1840

Saturday, August 25th, 2012

English miniature soft paste pottery pearlware ladle from set of child’s dishes, measuring 3-3/4″ long and dating from the early to middle 1800s. The two broken halves are bound together by a criss cross of thin brass wire woven through 2 tiny holes on either side of the break. Small dabs of cement in each hole help secure the repair.

I pity the small child who briefly lost the use of their ladle during what might have been a fantasy feast. And I applaud the person who came to the rescue, making the two broken pieces whole again, thus allowing the imaginary dinner party to continue!

 

Bloor Derby coffee can, c.1810

Saturday, August 18th, 2012

Colorful porcelain coffee can exquisitely decorated in the French style, made between 1806 and 1825 in London by Derby at their Nottingham Road factory. The wishbone form handle was detached over 150 years ago and riveted, soon afterward, back onto the body by a skilled metalsmith. It is marked on the underside with a red crown, crossed batons a “D” and (pattern number) 770, all hand painted in red.

For another example of an inventive repair in the same porcelain pattern, see “Wounded survivor” teapot, c.1810

Now that I own two pieces from this stunning tea set, I am on the hunt to find the remaining pieces. But naturally, I will turn away from “perfect” examples and only rescue the ones with inventive repairs!