Posts Tagged ‘basalt’

Admiral Nelson teapot, c.1810

Wednesday, July 14th, 2010

A black basalt pottery teapot with relief decoration, made in England to commemorate Vice Admiral Horatio Nelson, who died in 1805 at the Battle of Trafalgar. Nelson become one of Britain’s greatest war heroes and many monuments in England have been erected in his memory

One side has a moulded relief vignette of a crocodile, a pyramid and a fort with military devices, surmounted by a banner titled “TRAFALGAR”, surrounded by classical acanthus leaves

Teapot measures 4-3/4″ high and is 10″ long

The reverse side shows a monument with the figures of Britannia and Victory holding a shield inscribed “NELSON”

Remains of black enamel are seen on the side of the replaced tin spout. It was quite common for teapot spouts to break or chip and I have dozens of examples of this type of repair in my collection. I have even seen silver mounts on intact spouts that would have been attached at the time of purchase for proactive protection

A well executed tin lid with turned pewter knob replaced the lost or broken lid. The large chipped scalloped edge remains unrepaired and was most likely damaged after the other repairs were done

This is another, more elaborate example of a black basalt teapot made to honor Admiral Nelson with similar decoration

Photo courtesy of Christie’s

Black basalt “one cup” teapot, c.1830

Friday, June 4th, 2010

Also known as a “Bachelor’s teapot” this small English stoneware teapot with a low round shape from the early part of the 19th century has an “Egyptian black” or “shining black” glazed basalt finish and stands 3-1/4″ tall. Some collectors and dealers believe tiny teapots such as this to be miniatures or part of a child’s tea set.

Spaniel lid finial is similar to the one on my post dated 3/12/10, English black basalt teapot, c.1810.

Ornate low relief scrollwork design surrounds the teapot and carries over to the handle design.

The end of the broken spout is repaired with a simple tin collar, one of the most common and simplest of metal repairs.

Bachelor’s salt glaze teapot, c.1820

Sunday, March 14th, 2010

Black basalt glazed pottery “one cup” (aka “Bachelor’s”) teapot from England with engine turned scroll relief decoration, stands 3-1/2″ high and was made in the early 1800′s.

A simple tin replacement handle was most likely made by a traveling tinsmith in the 1800′s.

The intact handle on an identical teapot to mine shows what the original handle looked like.

Photo courtesy of Alexandra Antiques

English black basalt teapot, c.1790

Friday, March 12th, 2010

This black basalt teapot with a neo-classical design of curtain swags was most likely made in Staffordshire, England in the late 1700s.

Teapot measures 9-1/2″ long and 5″ high.

The figural knob is in the form of a perched spaniel.

A well made silver spout replaces the original black basalt spout.

Another teapot, similar to mine, shows what the original simple shaped spout might have looked like on mine.