Archive for the ‘goblet’ Category

Pressed glass goblet with wood base, c.1860

Saturday, April 22nd, 2017

This EAPG (Early American Pattern Glass) goblet in the Honeycomb pattern was made in America during the Industrial Revolution between 1850 and 1870. It stands 3.25 inches high.

After the base snapped off, it was repaired at home with a primitive wood replacement. A quick and easy, yet inelegant, fix. Please take a look at two other similar pieces, Honeycomb pattern goblet and EAPG glass goblet, each with different shaped wood replacement bases. I would like to attend, or perhaps host, a dinner party with mismatched wine goblets such as these. And if things get rowdy, I may have to do a bit of re-repairing of my own.

This goblet with base intact shows what my goblet might have looked like before it became undone.

Photo courtesy of Brey Antiques

Champagne coupe with wood base, c.1850

Saturday, January 2nd, 2016

This hand blown glass champagne coupe with fluted stem was made around 1850, possibly in America. It measures 5-1/2 inches high.

I imagine during an exuberant New Year’s Eve toast, well over 100 years ago, the base snapped off. Rather than toss out the broken glass, a replacement base was made. A simple, nicely turned wood replacement base was attached to the remaining stem and the champagne was poured once again.

Happy New Year to my friends and followers of Past Imperfect: The Art of Inventive Repair!

IMG_8863

IMG_8865

IMG_8866

IMG_8869

Honeycomb pattern goblet, c.1860

Saturday, February 28th, 2015

I don’t like to use the term “make-do” to describe antiques with inventive repairs, as I feel it diminishes the artistry and integrity of the piece. But this EAPG (Early American Pattern Glass) 5-1/2″ tall goblet in the Honeycomb pattern is a make-do in the best sense of the word, a fine example of Yankee ingenuity. Made in America between 1850-1870 during the Industrial Revolution, machine-made pressed glass examples such as this were mass produced and available to all.

Though more affordable than hand blown glass counterparts, this goblet was still cherished enough by its owner to be repaired after it broke. In this case, after the base snapped off, a simple unpainted and overscaled wooden base was attached to what was left of the broken stem. The result is a bit comical, as we are left with a short, stout goblet with an extra wide wood base that resembles half of a yo-yo.

This example with its original base shows what my goblet looked like before it took a tumble.

EAPG-FLINT-GLASS-HONEYCOMB-PATTERN-GOBLET-CORDIAL

Photo courtesy of eBay

“Cat Tails & Fern” pattern goblet, c.1880

Saturday, November 23rd, 2013

This EAPG (Early American Pattern Glass) goblet was made between 1880 and 1890 in Pittsburgh, Philadelphia by Richards & Hartley Flint Glass Co. EAPG, strictly an American invention, was manufactured throughout the US during the Victorian period, from 1850 to 1910. It is estimated that there are upward of 3,000 different patterns, although closer to 1,000 patterns were most commonly used. This goblet, in the Cat Tails & Fern pattern, measures 6″ high and has a visible 3-mold mark.

After the base snapped off, I am assuming sometime in the early 1900s, an itinerate mender or perhaps the original owner attached a 6-sided brass sleeve to hold the two broken pieces back together. This subtle yet effective quick-fix repair did the trick to make the drinking vessel function again. I like the addition of the tiny red gummed label on the bottom with a cryptic “9999” written in cursive ink, the meaning known only to the original scribe.

This goblet with the same pattern is one of 1,100 donated to the Shelburne Museum in Shelburne, Vermont, by Dr. Elizabeth Garrison in 1987.

fern goblet

Pair of early blown glass wine goblets, c.1790

Saturday, May 26th, 2012

This unusual pair of American blown glass wine goblets date to the late 1700s and stand approx. 4″ tall. I love finding pairs of early repaired items and these are no exception. When the bases snapped off at the stems, a turned wood base was made for each as a practical replacement.

Free-blown glass goblet, c.1790

Tuesday, November 8th, 2011

This free-blown conical shaped wine glass with gadrooned bowl stands 4-1/2″ tall. I believe it to be of European origin and made in the late 1700s.

I especially like the lozenge shaped glass bubble “imperfection” on the side, which looks like a microscopic organism.

A crafty tinsmith transformed this goblet in to a tumbler, after the stem and foot snapped off sometime during its early life.

A “witches hat” style tin replacement foot with concave bottom measures 3″ in diameter.

This unaltered goblet with the same design still maintains its original double knob stem.

Photo courtesy of eBay

Blown & cut glass goblet, c.1870

Wednesday, September 29th, 2010

A simple design of vertical panels and horizontal stripes graces this elegant hand blown cut glass goblet, which measures 5-1/2″ tall and has a diameter of 3-5/8″. I believe this to be an American example from the mid to late 1800’s

The tin “witch’s hat” base replaces the long gone original glass foot and stem. As goblets were used on a daily basis by most family members, many became broken and were repaired both at home and by itinerant menders. I have numerous glass goblets in my collection with replaced wood & metal bases in a variety of unusual forms. Please enter “glass goblet” in the SEARCH box to the right to see more examples

Blown glass goblet, c.1850

Friday, July 23rd, 2010

Simply shaped thick-walled goblet of hand blown glass, possibly made in Germany and used for drinking beer, measures 5-1/4″ high.

A well made unpainted round tin base replaces the broken glass base, created by a skilled tinsmith in the late 1800’s.

Similar shaped glass goblet show with a trumpet shaped stem.

Photo courtesy of eBay

Unusual glass goblet, c.1880

Tuesday, July 13th, 2010

This seemingly simple American-made glass goblet is actually a uniquely crafted example of thrift and imagination. It utilizes the reuse of three different broken items: two seperate glass goblets and an oil lamp. The top portion bowl is made of blown glass and has a hand cut “thumbprint” pattern decoration.

 

The bowl and base are held together with a brass lamp ferrule (the collar that attaches a burner to a lamp base). Goblet measures 6″ high and has a diameter of 3-3/8″.

 

The three-mold pressed glass replacement base was salvaged from another goblet, making this a tripartite repair job!

 

American “make-do” at the MET, c.1791

Wednesday, June 23rd, 2010

The Metropolitan Museum of Art in New York City is home to many examples of antiques (and antiquities) with inventive repairs. Some are on display for the public to see and many more are buried away in their vast archive collection.

This blown and engraved glass presentation goblet is inscribed in script on the back: “New Bremen Glassmanufactory, 1791” and is inscribed on the base: “Presented to Thomas Mifflin, Governor of Pennsylvania”. It was made by John Frederick Amelung in New Bremen, Maryland and measures 10″ tall. This goblet can be seen in the American Wing in a showcase on the second level.

Photo courtesy of The Metropolitan Museum of Art